Molten Lava Slime Color

Cabochons are the charms of slime mixins. They are flat beads that you can mix in slime. They are made from resins, plastic or polymer clay that are usually painted which means the resulting slime is not just crunchy, it’s colorful too. Many of the cabochons, like you see above, are shaped in mini desserts that could include cupcakes, donuts, hamburgers, strawberries and cakes but you can even find tiny coffee mugs, butterflies or leaves. You can stick them into your slime when you finish mixing the ingredients together.

Blue Glow in The Dark Slime Pigment Powder

Poly pellets fill for slushie, crunchy slime or–as slimers call it–“fishbowl slime” is a popular ingredient for slime. The clear and transparent beads makes slime highly reflective and shiny. Poly pellets are weighted beads that are commonly used for stuffing bean bags or stuffed animals. The smooth edges and oval contour have a pleasant massaging sensation when you run fishbowl slime through your fingers. Since it is weighted, it can also provide some structure to the slime so that your creation can somewhat maintain a desired shape. While they are a bit bulky, poly pellets are easier to integrate into slime than round glass beads.

The most common addition to slime is a color. Your plain, DIY slime will most likely come out as clear or white, depending on your ingredients. But you’ll only see beautifully colored slimes all over the internet and Instagram. Color is one of the most important components of your slime. Especially when you are showing off your slime on Instagram. Others can’t feel the texture of your slime through the screen but they can ooh and aah at the way you see the slime catches the light. Color changing slime is  really interesting to play with. The color comes from thermochromic pigment, which changes color with temperature. So mix one of these color changing pigment powders and alternate between heating it up (by stretching it vigorously or placing it under a lamp) and cooling it back down.